Yeasted beer bread

Yeasted beer bread using 100% wholegrain wheat flour is not difficult to make.

Using a breadmachine it takes less than ten minutes to grind the wheat and mix the dough, and then another five hours to bake.

Beer and bread make a natural fit both being based on grains and fermented with yeast; the one with barley and the other wheat.

Using a sourdough culture will further make this an interesting loaf for those who love to experiment; the bacteria predigest the protein, dealing with the gluten issue that some have, though all the research suggests this is greatly exaggerated. Certainly for those suffering from Coeliac disease it is a real concern. The bloating and discomfort has more to do with an inadequate microbiome, and less of a true allergy for most of those complaining of pain after eating bread.

Yeasted beer bread with a glass of honey brown braggart.

Ingredients

  • 600 grams of freshly ground 100% wholewheat meal.
  • 2 large scoops of sourdough culture.
  • 300 ml beer
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 TBSP honey
  • 1 tsp dry yeast
  1. In the baking tin mix the flour, sourdough culture and beer.
  2. Twirl the paddle to mix.
  3. Allow to stand for a period; more about that below.
  4. Dissolve the salt and honey in a tablespoon of warm water and add to the mix.
  5. Again twirl the paddle.
  6. Sprinkle the dried yeast over the dough.
  7. Possibly add a tablespoon of partially refined flour.
  8. Place in the bread oven, and choose the 5 hour setting.

Gluten allergy is a real concern for some; the large amount of the amino acid proline, a ring structure unlike all others, makes for strong bonds which some digestive systems have difficulty breaking down.

The net result is the absorption of short chains of amino acids which are targeted as unknown proteins by the immune system; the 33-mer peptide is the most common fly in the ointment. Durum wheat, emmer and einkorn do not contain it, but most other wheat and spelt flours do[2].

For those who have no gluten issues, no standing and waiting period is necessary; go right ahead and bake.

For those with true gluten allergies, up to 24 hours of predigestion of the flour protein by the sourdough culture makes it likely that even those suffering from Coeliac disease may be able to enjoy yeasted beer bread[1].  Some may have to avoid the use of common wheat altogether.

Your yeasted beer bread will have a dark mahogany looking chewy crust depending on what brew you use. This loaf was made with a light brown honey braggart. Remove the oven dish carefully from the machine, and always allow it to stand for a few minutes. Using gloves, carefully shake the inverted container, and the loaf should slide out.

On this point, when washing make sure that every bit of dough is cleansed from the baking tin, otherwise the loaf will stick and be difficult to remove.

Make sure the paddle has come out, and is not still embedded in the loaf. If so remove it immediately; I use a hooked crochet stick.

Be very careful not to scratch either the baking dish or the paddle.

If the loaf sinks in the middle, try adding a little less liquid; it will not affect the rich yeasted beer bread flavour, but doesn't please the eye so much!

For those who love to get their fingers sticky and knead the dough this Epicurious yeasted beer bread recipe should work fine. Two hours of hard labour as against five to ten minutes, and I remain unconvinced that nutritionally it is any better. It is good exercise for the arms and shoulders for those who have the patience and time on their hands. Using the whole oven requires a lot more electricity.

Why is whole grain better?

Yeasted beer bread

Yeasted beer bread is no more difficult to make than any other loaf; we use only 100% wholemeal flour.

» » Yeasted beer bread


  1. Sourdough Bread Made from Wheat and Nontoxic Flours and Started with Selected Lactobacilli Is Tolerated in Celiac Sprue Patients
  2. Quantitation of the immunodominant 33-mer peptide from α-gliadin in wheat flours. Web: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep45092


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