Honey brown beer

Braggot beer made with honey.

Honey brown beer is not in the slightest bit difficult to make using a brew kit. If you have your own hives then the cost is about half of that from the bottle store, and fifty times as nice. The most difficult step is absolutely clean bottles for storing it in.

The larger the bottle the better as that is where the time and effort goes. But that does create a problem as you will probably drink more.

It takes as much time to clean and sterilise a one-litre bottle as another of say 350 ml.

Braggot

Geoffrey Chaucer, writing more than six hundred years ago was the first known author to call it a braggot. Certainly it is likely that honey brown beer went back long before that time as sugar only arrived much later on the scene.

A braggot is to beer what mead is to wine; they both ferment the sugars in honey to alcohol and both take us back to the mists of time.

Interestingly Pliny the Elder wrote nearly two thousand years ago that the British drank large amounts of a honey brew; that could have been a mead or a braggot.

Beer kit

I have no experience of making beer from basic principles, but I have been brewing mead and a honey brown beer from a kit for many years; the latter is far simpler and quicker. You can be enjoying your braggot after a week, but the wine really needs to mature for over a year; otherwise it is harsh like a cheap whiskey.

Your beer kit contains hops and a malted barley extract.

You will need a plastic bucket or large glass jar that will hold 25 or more litres. The lid must be airtight, with a hole drilled for an airlock bubbler.

Also needed is a long-handled plastic stirring spoon and a hydrometer for measuring the specific gravity; there is no other assured way of being certain that fermentation is complete. In the early days in my naivety I thought I could do without, and bottled too soon. It is not pleasant having shrapnel flying through the air in the pantry when the glass burst.

A cool day

Choose a cool day when the temperature is below 20*C. If the wort goes above 22 degrees, unpleasant tasting esters are formed. Do not make your honey brown beer in midsummer unless you have a way of keeping it cool.

On the other hand if the temperature drops below about 12*C then fermentation will stop. Choosing the right weather to make your honey brown beer is critical.

Step one

Thoroughly sterilise the bucket, tap, plastic spoon and hydrometer for one hour.

Pour the sterilising liquid into your clean, empty beer bottles; the larger the better. I use one litre.

Step two

Bring roughly three litres of spring or rainwater to the boil in a large stainless steel or enamel pot. Add the contents of your beer kit, and stir with the long-handled plastic spoon.

Allow to simmer for fifteen minutes.

Step three

Meanwhile thoroughly rinse out your bucket and half fill with more very cold spring or rainwater; you really do not want any chlorine in there. Add a few trays of ice. The temperature of the boiling honey brown beer concentrate must be dropped as quickly as possible.

Place the pot of boiling concentrate into a large bucket of cold, running water. Stir your honey brown beer so that it will cool very quickly.

Step four

Pour about 2 kg of liquid honey into the cool water and stir vigorously to dissolve the sugars.

Step five

Pour the now partially cooled concentrate into your fermentation bucket that is half-filled with cold spring water and the honey. This is known as the wort and the temperature really should be below 30*C in twenty minutes or less. Allow to cool further. 

Add more cold water until you have made up sufficient to leave a gap of at least 50 mm above the wort. Stir vigorously to ensure most of the honey has dissolved.

Large bubbles will form once fermentation begins and some of your braggot may escape through the bubbler if you fill the bucket too much; it makes a mess.

Step six

Taking beer hydrometer readings is very important to ensure that fermentation is complete; sometimes the process temporarily slows and you may be fooled into bottling whilst there are still some sugars in the wort. That is very dangerous and you will have exploding glass shrapnel; you will lose all your work and could lose an eye.

Take your first reading before fermentation begins by dropping the hydrometer into the wort; it enables you to calculate the alcohol content. Mine was around 40 but not all the honey had yet dissolved.

A braggot is traditionally very strong with an alcohol content of around 8 percent, but you can control it by the amount of honey you add.

Never bottle until the specific gravity is below 8 which is a little sweet for my liking; about 4 is better. This will take about two weeks depending on the ambient temperature.

Step seven

Sprinkle the yeast over the wort when the temperature is in the range 18 - 22 degrees C. Attach the tight fitting lid to the bucket.

Fit your airlock into the grommet in the lid; a wad of prestik will also make a good seal. It is important the carbon-dioxide formed by fermentation can escape, but no air get back in.

Add a little clear alcohol such as cane spirit to the bubbler. Use a loose-fitting cap as the fruit flies will take a keen interest in your honey brown beer. The little plastic packet that the yeast came in will also work perfectly well.

Step eight

Step eight is the most pleasant part of making honey brown beer, apart from sampling your braggot of course. Pull up a chair with a good book; after about a day a most satisfying bleeping sound will emanate from the bubbler as the yeast cells go about their work. It may put you to sleep if it is not a gripping tale.

When the bubbles diminish after about a week, take a small sample from the tap and test the specific gravity using your hydrometer; use a spray bottle to rinse out the tap.

Step nine

If you are going to use finings dissolve them in 200 ml of boiling water and pour it into the wort. Reseal the bucket and leave it for two days. Personally I do not do this step.

Step ten

And now for the odious part, depending on how idle you were on finishing your honey brown beer. If you rinsed out each bottle two or three times every evening, then the process is relatively simple.

In fact I start here when sterilising the bucket right at the beginning in step one.

Swirl out each bottle with clean water a few times, and add the sterilising liquid from the bucket using a funnel.

Then when you are ready to bottle, shake up each one with the sterilising fluid, discard into a plastic container with about 25 caps, depending on the size you are using, and rinse thoroughly a few times. Turn them upside down to drip-dry.

Swish the caps around a few times in the bucket, discard the liquid and rinse several times. Drain and allow to dry.

Step eleven

To give your honey brown beer a head you need to prime each bottle with a little sugar at the rate of 1 level teaspoon per 750 ml.

You could use honey, but it is messy. Place a small funnel into the first litre bottle and add 1.3 tsp of sugar; the amount is not critical but just do not be too generous. Do the same to all 25.

Step twelve

Getting some help, place the bucket on a raised, very sturdy surface. Fill each bottle to roughly 40 mm from the top, and then cap it. This takes some practice; you will probably break a few until you get the knack.

You can start drinking your braggart straight away but it is best to leave it for a few weeks; it does mature and improve.

Time

This is a rather time-consuming process, taking perhaps three hours in total; why would you do it? Firstly, it is unlikely you can purchase a braggart; after the Belgium beers which are in the same league, I have never comes across a Pilsner as fine as this.

Secondly, your honey brown beer has not been sterilised; it is teaming with wonderful yeast cells that act as a probiotic. By establishing a stable microbiome in the gut you are far less likely to be savaged by a pathogen when it arrives; they will simply be overwhelmed by the trillions of good guys.

There is masses of research now showing that the microbiome in the intestine supports your immune system and has a profound influence on the whole body. Your braggart will provide the yeast cells and a culture of kefir say, the bacteria and other bugs; they will certainly give you a measure of protection against the coronavirus. Google the gut-lung axis for more information.

We have been indoctrinated with the idea that these bugs are bad and must be wiped out immediately; that is fake news and utterly false.

Your bought ales and lagers have been sterilised and have no probiotic benefit. And lastly, a braggart is one of the finest tasting beers that you will ever get to sample. Your circle of friends will immediately double.

Glycemic response to beer

Given that my honey pilsener is not the same as a homebrew made using sugar, nor a commercial lager or ale, I have decided it would be prudent to know what is my glycemic response to beer.

Time (mins)

0

30

60

120

Beer (ml)

230

+230

+230

-

Blood glucose

3.9

4.5

5.2

4.9

Clearly honey brown beer, also known as a braggot, has no dramatic effect on my blood glucose. You, of course, would most likely react it a different way.

A triglyceride test might be quite different.

Honey brown beer

Honey brown beer is at least fifty times as nice as any from a bottling company; and you can be sure there are no noxious chemicals added.

In South Africa you can purchase your honey brown beer kit from the home-brew shop.

  1. Bernard Preston
  2. How to start beekeeping
  3. Honey brown beer

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