Fennel and tomato salad

Fennel and tomato salad on greens gives protection against cancer; turn it into a Greek salad with olives and feta cheese.

This page was created on 27th October, 2018.

  1. Bernard Preston
  2. Easy Lunch Recipes
  3. Fennel and tomato salad



By Bernard Preston

It will take you less than half an hour to prepare a scrumptious salad like this; it's the epitome of slow, nutritious food, made fast.

  1. A fennel bulb
  2. Two red ripe tomatoes
  3. A sliced half red onion
  4. Two shallot spring onions

Dressing for a fennel and tomato salad

For the dressing you need

  1. 50ml of plain double cream joghurt.
  2. Two tablespoons of olive oil.
  3. A peppadew, or chilli.
  4. Half a lemon with the pulp, but pips removed.
  5. Optional is a clove of garlic.
  6. A TBSP of water.
  7. A shake of salt.

A stick blender is my favourite, so much easier to clean. Sprinkle the dressing with chopped red sweet peppers, ready for your guests to drizzle on their salad.

Fennel is a wonderful herb to grow in the garden, but we have to grow it in an onion pocket; it's roots are highly prized by the moles but they leave the bulb intact.

It has a distinct taste (and scent) of anise but really it's a member of the carrot family. It's a beautiful plant for any garden.

Add chilli according to your taste; some like it hot.

The fennel is growing behind the kale that is in the foreground.

  • Make a bed of varied lettuce leaves in your favourite salad bowl.
  • Finely sliced very young kale leaf.
  • Cover it with the finely sliced fennel and onion, and layer the shallots, and tomato around the edge.
  • Add olives and feta cheese.
  • Sprinkle with a little chilled water.

Fennel and tomato salad

Fennel and tomato salad provides the coloured foods that research indicates we need to give us the defense against the attack of serious disease.

This dish is particularly good for those of you who are on one of the ketogenic diets. The only carbohydrate is in the fibre to be found in all the salads and they are largely undigested in the small intestine anyway, producing little rise in blood glucose, but instead contribute to feeding the microbiome in the colon.

We always have a dish of our homemade hummus on the table whenever we have a salad, emphasizing our need for more vegetable protein. It does have a little starch, but again because of the protein and fat, has little effect on blood glucose should you be insulin resistant.

We also enjoyed half an avocado with our fennel and tomato salad, because they are in season, and our three trees are loaded. They are a better source of oil to my mind, than that from an animal source that is so often advocated in the ketogenic diets, high in fat.

This is one of our best easy lunch recipes; if you have the fennel on hand. Otherwise think of another dish; could you replace it with celery? Of course.

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