Lutein macular degeneration

Lutein macular degeneration tells how an awful eye disease is largely preventable. Many and perhaps most illnesses today are the result of either the vital phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals being refined out of good food, or the preservatives and other substances added to it.




Not only macular degeneration of the retina, but also cataract formation, is preventable by the presence of certain antioxidants in the eye.

Much research has been done with beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin E, omega 3 and zinc; more about that later.

We start this page on lutein macular degeneration with a little tour of the anatomy of the eye; if you're really not interested, then just scroll down.

Photo receptors in the eye called cones are sensitive to colour; they are packed in the central spot known as the macula. They come in three colours, red, green and blue.




The cones have various proteins, or pigmentation, which respond to stimulation by differing wavelengths. They are made light sensitive by vitamin A; a deficiency causes half a million children every year to go blind.

The cones enable us to see fine detail as in reading, and colour, making one able to visualise different parts of the spectrum. They capture the photons from light rays, converting it to chemical energy which then is detected by a nerve ending, and an impulse is sent to the brain via the optic n. 

Lutein absorbes the high energy blue light giving protection to the eye.

There are two types of macular degeneration; that which is inherited, and that which is age-related, or acquired. This page relates only to the latter.


Lutein macular degeneration

Lutein macular degeneration reminds us of the importance of eating healthily before disease begins; prevention always was, and still is better than a cure. Carotenoids are coloured pigments produced by plants. Enjoyed from fruit and vegetables there is abundant evidence that they reduce cancer, cardiovascular conditions and eye diseases, just to mention a few.

But large trials found no benefit from taking supplements; you have to get these carotenoids from the foods where they are found. They are only of value in prevention; once you have the disease, they are of little benefit to the sight already lost.




Lutein acts as an antioxidant, mopping up free radicals and giving protection against what is known as oxidative stress. It is found in high concentrations in the macula where colour and fine detail are detected by the eye.

This carotenoid, together with two others called zeaxanthin and oleocanthal, gives protection against the age-related type of macular degeneration. 

In a landmark research project, reported in 2007 in JAMA, scientists found that an increase in lutein, and it's twin sister zeaxanthin, significantly reduced the likelihood of developing three important eye diseases, of which age-related macular degeneration is but one; in total they affect over five million Americans.

Their conclusion is that higher intake of lutein and zeaxanthin from foods have a reduced likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration.

In other research, French scientists have found that those regularly consuming extra virgin olive oil, which is where the third carotenoid, oleocanthal, is found also have less cataracts and blindness from AMD.


Age related eye disease study

Researchers found that high doses of

  1. Vitamin C
  2. Vitamin E
  3. Beta carotene
  4. Zinc

significantly reduce the chance of getting advance age related Macular Degeneration.

However, the beta carotene caused an increased incidence of lung cancer in smokers, so a second study was done,

  1. Replacing beta carotene with lutein and zeaxanthin.
  2. Omega-3 oil

Results showed that the omega-3 made no further improvement, and the lutein and zeaxanthin mixture instead of beta carotene was just as effective.


More research

A massive study published in JAMA in 2015, after following over 100,000 nurses, both male and female for 26 years, found a risk reduction of 40% of developing age related Macular Degeneration when comparing those with the most lutein and zeaxanthin to those with the least in the blood.


Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a complementary factor in lutein macular degeneration. Research published in 2015 in JAMA Ophthalmology reported a massive 6.7 increased odds of women developing age related Macular Degeneration if they were deficient in vitamin D.

Vitamin D is best obtained from moderate exposure to sunshine, with a hat, and cold water fish like salmon, mackerel, pilchards, and mussels.



Cataracts

Research published in 2010 in Current Medial Research and Opinion confirms the that dietary supplementation with preparations including lutein and zeaxanthin not only "significantly decreased the incidence of age-related macular degeneration but also the development of nuclear lens opacities; cataracts." 


In general your greens are the richest source of lutein and zeaxanthine. Top of the list by a mile is raw kale, with lightly steamed kale second in line.

Spinach, broccoli, lettuce and corn on the cob are all good sources of lutein and zeaxanthine, as are eggs.

Free range eggs have 7 times more carotenoids, obviously from the greens the hens themselves enjoy. Just watch a group of chickens if they get into the kale patch; they go crazy.  


Foods high in lutein and zeaxanthin

So here's the deal; enjoy foods high in lutein and zeaxanthin or get cataracts and a high probability of blindness.

Nutritional value of kale

The recommended allowance is a minimum of 5mg of lutein per day; 1 cup of raw kale, and half a cup of lightly cooked kale provide 3-4 times the daily requirement; you'll avoid deficient lutein macular degeneration.

There are thousands of these vital phytochemicals; it's simply impossible to take them all in supplement form. The solution to lutein macular degeneration and the thousands of other disease caused by a deficiency, is to enjoy coloured foods on a daily basis.

In fact research shows that those enjoying 8 or more coloured foods every day have a massive 35% lower all cause of death.

The nutritional value of kale is an important page for anyone concerned about their eyes.

Kale is not one of the most interesting tasting foods; dicky it up with one of these recipes for cooking kale.


How to grow corn

How to grow corn is just one way to decrease your risk of deficient lutein macular degeneration.

Maize gets bad press these days, mainly because of the devastating effect of high fructose corn syrup used by irresponsible food manufacturers on the body.

But the very low carbohydrate Banting diet also frowns on corn in any form because of its albeit natural starch content.

Our strong recommendation is to enjoy all these natural foods on a daily basis. In the context of the whole meal fresh corn on the cob certainly cannot be described as a glycemic food; the effect on blood sugar is slow to moderate.


Bernard Preston

Bernard Preston is passionate about attempting as far as possible to live a life without medication. That means plenty of exercise and a return to the foods that our grandmothers served; they would not have suffered from lutein macular degeneration.

The last fifty years during which our mothers were greatly influenced by the move away from natural living to convenience foods, have been characterised by obesity and skyrocketing autoimmune diseases.

Whilst the research mentioned above is about the dietary supplementation in the struggle with lutein macular degeneration, our focus is rather about getting these substances naturally on a daily basis from our food.

» » Lutein macular degeneration


Did you find this page interesting? How about forwarding it to a friend, or book and food junkie. Or, better still, Face Book or Twitter it. 


What's this site about?

Bernard Preston books

A family affair by Bernard Preston

Consulting a chiropractor

Femoral nerve AP Xray

Bernie's healthy choice foods

Cooking green beans Bernard Preston passion

Bernie's bread

Bread machine loaf by Bernard Preston

Bernie's garden

green beans and granadillas Bernard Preston

Bernie's bees

Bees workforce in Bernard Preston's garden

Bernie's solar

Residential solar panels at Bernard Preston's home

Bernie's glider

View from Bernard Preston's glider